Occam's Razor - The simplest explanation is usually the right one

Common sense is the basis of Occam’s Razor and complex answers often obscure the simple truth.

Many projects presented in our village meetings have ultimate objectives disguised in long complex documentation or revealed in changes at a later date. Distractions and the use of human behavioral science is utilized to wear down resistance. Meeting postponed, scheduled at inconvenient times and then are drawn out to long boring sessions knowing the human attention span breaking or softening point. A form of Stockholm syndrome. Over time we have come to recognize this as Kow Pies!

Cut through the smoke and mirrors using Occam's Razor!

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You've probably heard it before: The simplest explanation is usually the right one.

Detectives use it to deduce who is the likeliest suspect in a murder case. Doctors - use it to determine the illness behind a set of symptoms. Sometimes logical characters arrive at the simplest answer by eliminating the unlikely first.

“When you dismiss the impossible, whatever you have left, however improbable, is the answer.”

Occam's razor is used in a wide variety of ways throughout the world as a means to slice through a problem or situation and eliminate unnecessary elements. But what we call the razor is an expansion of what its author originally wrote. This has been refined to make logical conclusions in a scientific world.

So who is this Occam fellow? Actually Occam (or Ockham) is a town in England, not a man. More specifically, it’s the town where William of Occam was born. William lived from about 1285 to 1349, during the medieval age, a time when surnames were uncommon and people were known by their place of provenance.

William lived as a philosopher and a Franciscan monk, a pious man who took very seriously his vow of poverty, meaning he lived using only what was absolutely necessary. One might get the impression that it was this vow of poverty, a form of simplicity that gave William his big idea. William captured the essence of the principle and packaged it in a way that was easily understood (by anyone who knew Latin, at least). By creating a couple of simple sentences, he managed to encapsulate a world of medieval logic, ensuring its safe passage into modern times.

Occam's razor is based on the notion that simplicity equals perfection. It fits perfectly with the scientific methods

Occam's razor is based on the notion that simplicity equals perfection. It fits perfectly with the scientific method -- the series of steps scientists take to prove or disprove something. Indeed, you could make the case that the scientific method was built upon Occam's razor.

It's important to remember that Occam's razor is a guide or a suggestion that states that when given two explanations for the same thing, the simpler one is usually the correct one.

The example of Einstein versus Lorentz is a good illustration of who uses Occam's razor the most - scientists. To make their way through enormous equations, scientists often use the razor to get easily from point A to point B in a data set. After all, the easiest and best route between two points is a straight line.

Skeptics use Occam's razor as a fundamental tool and sometimes as evidence itself. Skeptics tend to believe only in what they can sense or in what can be proven scientifically.

Common sense is the basis of Occam’s razor and complex answers often obscure the simple truth.

“When you dismiss the impossible, whatever you have left, however improbable, is the answer.”

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